~Vagrant Ideations~
"Anyone who has never made a mistake, has never tried anything new." Albert Einstein.


**This blog intends only to promote and share art and artists and has no commercial activity. However, if you are the artist that I have posted and would like to have your images removed, please contact me. I will remove it as requested. Thank you.**
~Vagrant Ideations~
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judgmentalmaps:

Houston, TXby jr.ewing.78
jr.ewing.78 Copr. 2014. All Rights Reserved.
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all-funny-memes:

"Excuse sir..what the fuck do you think you are doing?"
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fyblackwomenart:

instagram : ethrl_
 : : submission : :
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"Write hard and clear about what hurts."
Ernest Hemingway (via wordsnquotes)
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Dog for adoption
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Born before the era of the microprocessor, the Wang 2200 CPU was built using a couple hundred TTL chips spread over half a dozen boards, and housed in a heavy steel “suitcase.” Its BASIC interpreter was written in microcode; there was no machine code that a user could access, unlike microcomputers that would come years later.
The first 2200 shipped in May, 1973. What made it an interesting machine was that it was clearly what one would now call a personal computer. Up until that time, programmers dealt with the large and impersonal mainframe computers, or perhaps programmed on terminals connected to mini-computers via serial lines. At the low end, there were programmable calculators, but these were limited and difficult to program.
The 2200, though, was something else. The machine had a capable BASIC interpreter in ROM, meaning it could be turned on and used within seconds. It was dedicated to the needs of a single person at any one time. The 64x16 CRT display made editing and running programs interactive and immediate, vs. the then-standard method of studying printouts on greenbar paper. The 2200 was also expandable; eventually nearly 100 different peripherals were developed for the system.
In some respects, it was similar to microcomputers that came four or five years later, such as the Commodore Pet or the TRS-80. Of course, the 2200 was much more rugged, reliable, and expandable than such machines.
Over the years, the 2200 evolved to have an ever-more powerful BASIC dialect, to accommodate multiple users simultaneously. New models were produced for nearly 20 years before Wang ended development.
Born before the era of the microprocessor, the Wang 2200 CPU was built using a couple hundred TTL chips spread over half a dozen boards, and housed in a heavy steel “suitcase.” Its BASIC interpreter was written in microcode; there was no machine code that a user could access, unlike microcomputers that would come years later.
The first 2200 shipped in May, 1973. What made it an interesting machine was that it was clearly what one would now call a personal computer. Up until that time, programmers dealt with the large and impersonal mainframe computers, or perhaps programmed on terminals connected to mini-computers via serial lines. At the low end, there were programmable calculators, but these were limited and difficult to program.
The 2200, though, was something else. The machine had a capable BASIC interpreter in ROM, meaning it could be turned on and used within seconds. It was dedicated to the needs of a single person at any one time. The 64x16 CRT display made editing and running programs interactive and immediate, vs. the then-standard method of studying printouts on greenbar paper. The 2200 was also expandable; eventually nearly 100 different peripherals were developed for the system.
In some respects, it was similar to microcomputers that came four or five years later, such as the Commodore Pet or the TRS-80. Of course, the 2200 was much more rugged, reliable, and expandable than such machines.
Over the years, the 2200 evolved to have an ever-more powerful BASIC dialect, to accommodate multiple users simultaneously. New models were produced for nearly 20 years before Wang ended development.
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heck-yeah-old-tech:

Did I ever show you this unpunched computer punch card? This came from an aunt who has a door wreath fashioned from a whole bunch of these then spraypainted gold. There’s a craft project you won’t see done today! (Wish I had a photo of the wreath to show you but I didn’t take one before she moved to Arizona. Maybe someday?)
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vintagemarlene:

card catalog
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latenightnurse:

cranquis:

You’ll never guess where this little feller was hiding. And for how long.

EWWWW!!!!!

IN his ear!!!!